Bobbie Rathbun still remembers the time as a child when she wasn’t allowed to go to the mall or the movie theatre or the local swimming pool over fear of coming into contact with large crowds.

While our widespread COVID-19 health protocols are new to most, for a certain generation, physical distancing was the norm as parents tried to protect their children from another devastating, infectious disease: polio.

Bobbie Rathbun still remembers the time as a child when she wasn’t allowed to go to the mall or the movie theatre or the local swimming pool over fear of coming into contact with large crowds.

While our widespread COVID-19 health protocols are new to most, for a certain generation, physical distancing was the norm as parents tried to protect their children from another devastating, infectious disease: polio.

“I know how happy my parents were when the vaccination became available [in 1955] and parents at that time were lining up to have their children vaccinated because it was such a deadly disease,” recalled Rathbun, chair of the Pedal for Polio initiative for the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium.

Mainly affecting children under five, polio has largely been eradicated globally, although it persists in certain underdeveloped and often politically volatile countries, such as South Sudan, Afghanistan and Pakistan. Continue Reading Here

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